Prognosis: “perfection”. So excited, I just can’t hide it.

Home Forums Progress Reports and Achievements Prognosis: “perfection”. So excited, I just can’t hide it.

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    • #14288
      ChristopherKelsall
      Participant

      Today, I went for my two-year X-Ray to see what is going on since hip replacement surgery. I had a right side job, ceramic into cross-linked poly on D
      [See the full post at: Prognosis: “perfection”. So excited, I just can’t hide it.]

    • #14289
      Dave Whiteside
      Participant

      That’s great news Chris. My hip celebrated 8 years yesterday and it’s still going strong. I managed to break into the 30’s a couple of years ago but really haven’t done any speed work the last couple of years as that’s what would set my hip off, so now I’m a little slower. I wish you well and hope you break it, but listen to your body and back off if need be, but I’m sure you know that. Good luck, Dave.

    • #14290
      kingofyick
      Participant

      Brilliant news Chris. I’m 4 months post op now and just started to use the treadmill but my hip feels a little sore the day after. Did you find this and how long post op was you when to made a return to running ?
      Thanks Ian.

      • #14297
        ChristopherKelsall
        Participant

        Thanks, Dave Whiteside, and Ian:

        I waited three months to the day, plus one additional day just to make sure, before I did anything that resembled running. That first one was really a shuffle-walk interspersed with little faster bits and I used my downhill ski poles too. It was a dirt path, 10K, when I finished I laughed out loud, 2:04:00 on a route I previously ran 37:00-45:00 depending on the purpose of the run. Hilarious.

        The doctor said, “It will take two years to fully heal everything up from surgery.” So this is why I am excited. Two years have passed, plus a few days, to make sure.

        My surgeon placed the joint out .5 of an inch westward for better wear as he knows I am very active and was 50 (not 70+) when I had it done. He absolutely says no to running, but I am pretty sure he knows that I am running.

        Now I still have limpy days. Quite often actually. But they are becoming less and less. Sometimes not at all. I just remind myself that the “pain” associated with the post-exercise stimulus is soft tissue. If you can feel it, it is not the prosthetic – can’t feel that sucker. If it broke, you would sense mechanical stuff going on. So as you likely know, you need to massage, roll, stretch, heat, rest soft tissues.

        The trade-off for having my sexy hip sticking out an extra .5 of an inch to the west is that my adductors need a lot of massage and heat and my IT can get a little tight and the scar-band snaps over the hip bone with certain movements, like an elastic band over some smooth surfaced corner. Sproing!

        I get downright aggressive with the soft tissue, really beat the snot out of it with a rolling pin and use my weight to roll with the foam roller and rolling pin and hockey ball and lacrosse ball and this other rolling ball-like unit.

        It’s worth it. I can now bang out a 20K in under two hours with no repercussions. Not fast, but improving.

        I can run into the 4s per Km off and on in runs that are, say under 10K. But also, haven’t mentioned this to anyone here, but I told my wife that the surgeon said that sex improves the hip movement tremendously, so I have to have sex as often as humanly possible. So there is that lie.

        But actually, if you are still reading, I had 10 years off of consistent running. Five associated with the hip and three years around two Haglund’s Deformity surgeries, also known as Retrocalcaneal Bursitis.

        That is why it is taking a long time for my fitness to return. For someone down a year or two, they would have been further along than I am.

        But, I get to have sex all the time, so there is that lie.

        Cheers,

        C

    • #14298
      Laura M
      Participant

      That is fantastic news. I just hit the 3 month post surgery mark and yesterday had my first session with my running coach. It felt so good to buy new running shoes. I started with a series of dynamic warm-up exercises and then we did a walk/run scenario. I had a posterior THR, so my glutes need to be strengthened before I can run for any length of time. I am just so happy to start back running.

      Love this blog!

    • #14432
      Petemeads
      Participant

      Hi Christopher, great news! Have been following your progress with interest, and from time to time competitive intent… My THR recently hit 18 months, I have been focused on 5k parkruns and managed to get down to sub-24 (23:59 and 23:52) and the day after the first of these ran 40:04 for 5 miles (with age-group prize!) but that was in July. My 10k race in May was 55 mins, much to my disgust, but I have run for an hour on the treadmill since (7.2 miles) and the best 10k of that was 51:30.
      Unfortunately, my other sport of climbing has got in the way. My THR leg is slightly longer than it was, maybe ITB is the problem but something internal resents twisting and weighting this leg at the same time, leaving me with a limp for a while. During the summer I did not climb indoors at all, going back to bouldering to warm up for the winter comp had me limping for a week. Anyway, two rounds of competition and I can’t walk properly, let alone run. Biking is ok so I can stay fit, and I am leading my comp (the most basic level, admittedly) but something needs to be done – maybe an MRI scan if insurance will pay? Old BHR hip is absolutely fine, metal levels checked out ok at 3 years, so I was looking forward to being able to train regularly instead of just racing on Saturdays.
      Ironically, it was this time 2 years ago that my right hip sent the message that it was past redemption and I spent Xmas limping everywhere – getting a bit fed up!
      Anyway, in answer to your Masters age-grade question, your 37:14 for 9.74km equates at age 41 to 74.8%, at age 52 40:35 gives the same percentage (and the best I ever managed was 74%, at age 41). These figures come from the 2010 WMA age-grading calculator by Howard Grubb, easily found online. 2015 figures are available but are not so flattering, nor appropriate… My missus started running 10 years ago, she has been hitting 78% this year and still improving at age 66!
      Keep up the good work,
      Pete

      • #14444
        ChristopherKelsall
        Participant

        Hey Pete,

        Sorry to hear about the limping. Before giving my thoughts on that, I would like to clarify the time and distance – not that it really matters that much – my best of the lakes loop of 9.74 is 37:50 – it is a dirt surface and often soft due to mud and is typically about a minute slower than one’s road race. So my best road race is 37:12 from Vancouver Sun Run at age 42 or 41 maybe. I ran a bunch of 37:30s…..I ran a 36:54 time trial with a coach, which is about where I left off – a minute slower than the lakes loop – which made sense.

        I just ran that lakes loop under 50 for the first time since surgery. 49:56. Bit of a jump in performance by about 1.5 minutes. Surprised.

        Limping:

        You mentioned ITB. I have had some ITB and abductor response to running that is getting less and less as time goes by, but I still get it. Saw the surgeon the other day and he said that he put the prosthetic out about half of an inch for long more durable wear. So the soft tissue issue is very VERY likely due to that – everything needs to be a little longer, not unlike a young woman, who’s hips grow a little and they end up with ACL/IT issues for awhile and quite sports.

        If you can feel it, it is soft tissue. If it is soft tissue, skip the surgeon…..you probably been stressing the tendons and perhaps muscles in a funny way. Also, the surgeon said it takes at least two years to fully recover from the surgery. You are at 18 months???

        Just some thoughts….

        Also, how is your protein protocol and post-stimulus recovery?

        I kneed the heck out of my ITB and abductor areas often. Rolling pin, baseball, lacrosse ball, knuckles, rolling pin – you name it. And when you do soft tissue damage 25 grams of whole food protein with all the amino acids is best directly after vigorous physical exercise and just before bed.

        Red meat, eggs and cheese if you eat animal products.

    • #14445
      ChristopherKelsall
      Participant

      Sorry – a minute faster than the lakes loop. And another correction that probably doesn’t really matter either. The 37:50 was for the full 10K loop in a race…..

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