Independence Day Running?

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    • #19697
      WedgeC
      Participant

      Well hipsters – would love to hear some July 4 running plans / results!!!
      [See the full post at: Independence Day Running?]

    • #19698
      OB
      Participant

      June 30th marked one year since my THR. I declared it a success after starting back to running Jan 1st and since running 750 miles, biked 3500 miles and swam 180,000 ydds with zero pain. I did a sprint triathlon to celebrate my return, the first triathlon in close to two years. It was great to be back and able to run off the bike. After a year with zero setbacks, my goal, my wife dropped a log on my big toe while stacking wood the day before a 4th of July 4 mile race. My fault for not wearing my steel toe boots while doing yard work….so needless to say I couldn’t race.

      I took a couple days off of running and swimming but was able to bike. My next planned race is another sprint triathlon in late July. So glad I had my THR….now I just need to improve my speed so I can keep up with my grandkids during rainbow tag when they come to visit in a couple of weeks:-)

    • #19700
      WedgeC
      Participant

      Great news OB!
      Wish I could report positive news on my end… I’ve been struggling with hamstring strains/pulls once I started running following THR (about 2 months post-op) and I have not figured it out. 100 yards into my July 4th 5k I pulled my left hamstring and dropped.

      I’m finding I can ruck-shuffle without hamstring strain. REALLY INTERESTING – and have noticed this since my surgery- as long as I don’t stride long, it doesn’t seem to irritate me… not sure what to make of that? Perhaps a question for Dave Whiteside and other Hipsters…anyone finding that while they can run pain-free post op, it takes A LONG WHILE to run fast and stride it out? Would love your input on this!

    • #19701
      OB
      Participant

      I don’t know if it helps but I didn’t start running for six months after my THR. I used the first six months to do strength and mobility workouts along with walking up to 450 miles during that time. I started slowly and did my first 5k race at 10 months. When I did start running I did run/walks. I figure it will take me 18 months to feel like I am fully back to running. Currently I am hitting the track twice a week to get my stride and balance back.

    • #19702
      WedgeC
      Participant

      Thank you OB and that makes a lot of sense. I have probably pushed a little too hard to get back to running… now I’m paying a little price for it… Moreso in the mobility and stabilizer soft tissue strain and injury. One of the best things I’ve read on this forum is to “not trust your past (bodily) experience because part of our new body experience is an artificial joint”… it’s different; different alignment, different movement, different give and take, etc.

    • #19703
      shosking
      Participant

      Hi WedgeC, I’m 5.5 months post-THR, and just got to my first 5k. Coincidentally, it was at my pre-THR usual training pace, which is far slower than yours. While I’m a mediocre distance runner, I’ve always been a decent sprinter (100m, 400m, soccer forward). Nonetheless, when I introduced a couple of short strides after some easy runs, I definitely felt ‘weirdness’ around the joint that I’d never felt before. So even though speed comes (came?) more naturally to me than distance, it’s been easier to return to latter than former! Also, I don’t have any alignment changes to contend with e (got a custom hip, so retained same range of motion, angles, leg length etc).

      Perhaps what helps me is I’ve always been a mediocre runner, so I don’t feel pressure to chase past PRs as they were never impressive in the first place!

      Also, I made strength à priority and try to do a bit of balance too. I find doing strength before my runs helps warm up & activate my muscles. It also tires them out so I’m not tempted to overdo it.

      Oh and I was verrty gradual with getting to 5k: I started walk-runs at the beginning of May, and didn’t start running continuously until mid June. Have been biking too to build up cardio.

      Have patience, gradually rebuild your base so your body time can adapt to your new alignment, and I bet you’ll be able to find your running sweet spot again!

    • #19704
      shosking
      Participant

      Hi WedgeC, I’m 5.5 months post-THR, and just got to my first 5k. Coincidentally, it was at my pre-THR usual training pace, which is far slower than yours. While I’m a mediocre distance runner, I’ve always been a decent sprinter (100m, 400m, soccer forward). Nonetheless, when I introduced a couple of short strides after some easy runs, I definitely felt ‘weirdness’ around the joint that I’d never felt before.
      So even though speed comes (came?) more naturally to me than distance, it’s been easier to return to latter than former! Also, I don’t have any alignment changes to contend with e (got a custom hip, so retained same range of motion, angles, leg length etc).

      Perhaps what helps me is I’ve always been a mediocre runner, so I don’t feel pressure to chase past PRs as they were never impressive in the first place!

      Also, I made strength à priority and try to do a bit of balance too. I find doing strength before my runs helps warm up & activate my muscles. It also tires them out so I’m not tempted to overdo it.

      Oh and I was verrry gradual with getting to 5k: I started walk-runs at the beginning of May, and didn’t start running continuously until mid June. Have been biking too to build up cardio.

      Have patience, gradually rebuild your base so your body can adapt to your new alignment, and I bet you’ll be able to find your running sweet spot again!

    • #19705
      WedgeC
      Participant

      Thank you for that input and feedback! Much appreciated!!! I like the tiring of the muscles first and not chasing PR’s mindset!!!

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