SarahH – how I got here

Hi hiprunners,

Greetings from Day 9 following an anterior THR (uncemented ceramic/ceramic). Thanks to all of you who have posted about your own experiences, they gave me a much better idea of what to expect during my stay in the clinic.

Before I start posting updates I thought I’d first provide some history.

My backstory

I’m 49. While I consider myself more of a cyclist, for most of the past decade running has been my unrequited love. I’ve had a lot of running injuries just training for measly sprint & olympic tri’s. It’s been rather embarrassing and extremely humbling, especially since I was a decent sprinter in my youth.

It wasn’t until my late 20s that I got over my fear of ‘distance’ (read: anything over 400m), but from then to my mid-30s I was able to run casually and do the occasional 10k and even a half marathon without much thought.

Then we moved to France, and for the first few years I all but stopped exercising. After hitting 40, I decided to lose the extra weight, then to get back in shape I joined an expat triathlon club. While I really enjoyed training regularly and taking part in tri’s, every season I’d get some sort of show-stopper injury and would end up DNS for most of my events.

The magic formula: strength + frequency

After 6 years of trying out the usual suggestions (cadence, core galore, a run coach, etc..) only to be hit with another season-ender, I suspected my problem might be that my back and hips are so darn mobile that I need extra muscle to stabilize them enough to withstand training, never mind competing!

So I changed two things starting Jan 2019.

  1. Learn how to lift ‘heavy ‘ in the gym (by end of year I got up to 65kg for deadlift & squats, slightly over my body weight)
  2. Run slower but more often to improve run economy (If curious, google ‘BarryP 3:2:1 running’)

Hallelujah! Instead of getting injured from running a measly 3x/week, I was able to run 4-6x/week and felt great. My run … (Click Here to View Full Post and Comments)

Alistair – Running with a hip replacement and loving it

running after a hip replacement On Christmas day 2005 I walked out of Wellington Public Hospital with a new hip replacement and no pain at last. If it wasn’t for the crutches I’d have thrown my arms in the air in celebration, just as I did finishing the Western States 100 fourteen years earlier.

Hi fellow hippies and hippies-to-be, I’m Alistair from New Zealand, “thanks” Tom for bringing us all together. I mention the WS100 mile ultra-marathon because during that last long run in 1991 my genes overtook me – Hip dysplasia, the family curse. Over the following years niggling hip pain deteriorated until I struggled to walk. You probably know the stabbing hip pain well.

After hip replacement surgery I began using trekking poles and was soon able to enjoy walking some of my old trail-running routes. I had dutifully listened to my hip surgeon who answered “No” to the inevitable question “Will I be able to run after a hip replacement?”.

Running after hip replacement surgery in Belmont Regional ParkOne day though, about 5 years post-surgery, an old urge sneaked up on me. As I began my walk up Belmont Trig I leaned forward on my toes and started to run up the steep gravel track. My hip felt strong and it seemed such a natural thing to do. Since then I have spent many happy miles playing with and researching safe running techniques and learned a lot about running with a hip replacement, and myself.

My weekend runs range from two to five hours, although I have to sheepishly admit to injuring my right foot on a tough bush run about 5 weeks ago. It’s healing but, as I sit contemplating my unused running gear, I am reminded once again not to take running for granted.… (Click Here to View Full Post and Comments)