3 months post-op, 1st jog

Today I have given myself the best New Year present. Right hip done in May 2019, left hip in September 2019. Both were THJR with posterior approach. I still have abductors weakness and a limp on the left, slowly improving. I am now able to reach the floor, squat, and use a rowing machine for the first time after 10 years of very limited mobility. Today (3 months after the second operation) I started alternating 1 min walk with 1 min jog,  finishing a parkrun in 33:37. That’s 13 minutes slower than my pre-op PB but what a great feeling! I will build up from here. Up and onward.

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    • #17377
      Pietro
      Participant

      Today I have given myself the best New Year present. Right hip done May 2019, left hip September 2019. Both total joint replacements with posterior ap
      [See the full post at: 3 months post-op, 1st jog]

    • #17381
      NancyN
      Participant

      Excellent news Pietro! Had my three month checkup last week (THR left posterior, had same to right in 2014) I was cleared to do interval runs and have begun 1 minute runs on the treadmill. Can’t wait to run outside again. Lots of snow here, and I’m leery of running on icy/snowy roads. Best thing we can do is encourage each other to exercise and maintain muscle strength. My PT said as long as I maintain muscle strength I should not need to worry about any more hip procedures.
      Good luck and have a Happy Running 2020!

    • #17382
      Pietro
      Participant

      Well done and good luck to you too Nancy. I live in a perfect place for all year round running, never icy, never too hot. I think you do well to take care of avoiding traumatic injuries, as that is far more dangerous than any issues from repetitive efforts. It is interesting to see how different OSs have different -in fact opposing- views about how to best preserve your hip joints, and how little data is there to back up such opinions. As I work in the field, though I am not a surgeon, I have regular conversations with OSs. Just the other day I had 3 of them in front of me. Their views? Ranged from “no restrictions” to “you shouldn’t run at all”.
      Also, if you look at scientific publications, I think the “consensus” published by OSs is disconcerting. Hypothetically, many OSs deem activities like cycling, tennis, and downhill skiing (!) as preferable to running. But they fail to comment on – in fact they seem to have no idea of real life risks of breaking your femur from falls from a bike, or twisting legs while skiing.
      Again – consensus taken by “opinions” at meetings, no data to back up. I know where I stand… running is probably better than all that.

    • #17390
      Spiegwrite
      Participant

      Good to hear, Pietro and Nancy! I am scheduled for an anterior THR in 2 weeks, and I also have heard nothing but “don’t do it” regarding resuming running from doctors. Finding this community is a God send

    • #17469
      curryn
      Participant

      I’m 73 year old female 4 months post R THR and 9 months post L THR and started a self-created walk-run program in early December. I did 5 min jogs/5 min walks working up to 40 minutes total then started to decrease the rest intervals until I reached 5 min jog/2 min walking. A few days ago I finally graduated to one continuous 20 minute run at a very slow pace. All of this has been outdoors on flat terrain since I live where it’s warm. I did the run/walks every other day or even every 3rd day and intermittently used an elliptical to help build cardio back up. It’s been a struggle but I’m determined to get back to regular running. I occasionally get some left hip flexor pain afterwards but otherwise no issues other than I’m out of shape. I’ve also gotten back to two 30 minute strength training sessions a week. Any suggestions re further progression?

    • #17553
      Pietro
      Participant

      Well done Curryn. I suspect your DIY schedule is much better for you than any one-size-fit-all program. I am finding out that my new hip joints are not really an issue, rather I need to adapt depending on how other parts of the body respond to running. My left calf and right knee in particular seem to suffer from a mild residual limp from left hip adductors weakness (the one replaced most recently, almost 4 months ago). But it is all improving, and I am getting there. The balance between patience and perseverance is everything.

    • #18677
      Richard Browning
      Participant

      Hi Pietro, I’ve enjoyed reading your posts. I’ve been an avid runner for decades (59 years old, averaged about 113km/week in 2018). I am 21 weeks post-THR, I believe it was a lateral or posterior approach (something I should know!). I am struggling with soreness in the glutes, especially the medius, in particular where it attaches to the femur. I’ve done a lot of rehabilitation exercises and lots of walking (now doing 8k/day) and still haven’t lost the limp. I’m struggling with the idea of jogging a bit. I think that if I begin the way I always do after a layoff, conservative jog/walk intervals for several weeks, that the jogging might help with the abductor weakness in a way that the exercises aren’t. How did you find the evolution of abductor strength — and soreness — when you began jogging? I should add that I was on crutches for nearly a year before surgery, so the atrophy is significant on my operated side. Thanks, Richard

    • #18678
      Richard Browning
      Participant

      Oh, and the more problematic soreness is the tensor fascia latae, about 8cm below the outermost point of the greater trochanter. Thanks.

    • #18796
      Pietro
      Participant

      Hi Richard
      I find my sorest areas are like yours under my scars at the great trochanter. I am still weak with the abductors on the left. Every time in the gym I lie down on one side and lift the extended leg up in the air, locking the knee. The left is still sore and weaker.
      Some runs are followed by soreness, and some aren’t. Pretty random really. The best is to take time and rest between runs and restart when things are comfortable. It’s snakes and ladders really, 2 step forwards, one step back.

    • #18798
      Richard Browning
      Participant

      Hi, Thanks for the reply. I’m six months+ out now. I think I’ve been working the area too hard at times. I’ve tried jogging very slowly for 30-sec x 7-12 reps near the end of my walks and I am still suffering too much after. I’m trying it once a week now. I’m finding the elliptical activates the muscles well without causing so much soreness, so I’m doing that, without any resistance, 40 minutes or so, 3-3 days a week. The stability while walking has improved a great deal. I usually walk 90 minutes each mooring, but have done as much as 2:50 several times in the last month. I, too, find the TFL to be the limiter now, and the gluteus medius is still quite weak, as well. The 11 months I was on crutches before the surgery left the injured hip very weak. Best regards, Richard

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