Dave Whiteside

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 190 total)
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  • in reply to: THR on July 1, 2020 – working my way back – any input? #18838
    Dave Whiteside
    Participant

    There’s some validity in Jimmy C’s comments, you are more likely to hear about the people that have had success. I have been lucky and enjoyed some success with my running and will most likely hit 3,000 miles this year, so it can be done. I would wait 90 days before you start and treat the first year with short, very slow runs, build up your muscles and work on strength and flexibility. Then find out what works for you. I initially ran shorter, fast races, but after 2 one year injuries in my hip area, nothing actually wrong with implant, more muscle related I think, I’ve not moved to ultra running and really don’t have any issues with my hip. Go for it, but listen to your body and you will do well.

    in reply to: Early success and now it is time for a break #18822
    Dave Whiteside
    Participant

    Holy crap Tom, I just saw this post and your picture. I hope it’s a lot better now, I’ve never seen anything like that before. Great time on the Bloomsday race, that’s a very impressive time. I’m glad that you are able to train at the faster paces, for me that’s what always set my hip off and it takes me weeks to recover so for the most part I don’t do any real speed work nowadays. I really miss it and wish I could, perhaps one day I may take a break from ultra races and focus on shorter faster races, perhaps on the track as I’ve never done that. I ws hoping to come to Washington again this September to race but with Covid we’ve put those plans on hold and now I’m looking to go to Tennessee in October and have a 50K trail race in Georgia. Keep up the good work.

    in reply to: Convincing Spouse It’s OK to Run #18821
    Dave Whiteside
    Participant

    Ken, I did have an x-ray about 5 years ago when I was having issues with my hip but everything was good with the replacement. I think it was inflammation and muscles, since I have incorporated strength training and flexibility it’s been much better. Yesterday I ran a 6 hour race and completed 40 miles without thinking about my hip once during the event.

    in reply to: Convincing Spouse It’s OK to Run #18811
    Dave Whiteside
    Participant

    Hi Ken, that’s a tough one. I would talk about quality of life and how much running means to you. Life won’t end if you need another replacement, sure it would suck, but not as bad as missing out on all the miles you could have enjoyed. I will be running about 3,000 miles this year, 10 years post op. We’re all different but you should be able to run. Hope this helps, p.s. flowers and a bottle of bubbly will always help.

    in reply to: New Member #18588
    Dave Whiteside
    Participant

    Good luck with your surgeries, I’m sure you won’t regret them in a year when you are back running. Take you time and make sure you do some cross training and strength exercises. You have to listen to your body and find out what’s right for you. Looking forward to hearing your story. Dave.

    in reply to: Dave Whiteside honoured twice in May #18587
    Dave Whiteside
    Participant

    Wow, thank you Chris. It was great to join in your race and so glad I was able to represent the HipRunner team. Congratulations to Tom for leading our team with a very fast run. It just shows that there is life after a hip replacement, have faith, take your time, listen to your body and anything is possible. It’s been an amazing month for me, from my 60th birthday run, the couple of honors, running 200 miles week and actually winning an 8 hour race. I need to write another blog, or two.

    in reply to: Looking for some advice #18570
    Dave Whiteside
    Participant

    Hi Scott, I recommend giving it 3 months before you start running and just increase walking prior to then. Some people start sooner but I’m not sure it’s worth the risk. You have to listen to your body more than before, rest and/or slow down when you feel soreness. For me I don’t do much speed work as it’s harder on my hips, but running a 100 miler is okay. Everyone is different, you have to work out what’s right for you. Foam rolling, stretching, strength training and flexibility will all help. I also do triathlons for cross training. Anything is possible, this last week I ran 200 miles. Good luck, Dave.

    in reply to: Fearful to return to running #18566
    Dave Whiteside
    Participant

    Yes it’s a tough decision but what have you got to lose, at least that was my outlook. This year I will probably run close to 3,000 miles. Please feel free to reach out to me via email or Facebook Messenger for more information. Dave.

    in reply to: First Ever HipRunner Group Run – Please Join Us! #18476
    Dave Whiteside
    Participant

    Talking about bumping, I just bumped Tom down to third, sorry Tom.

    in reply to: Hi! #18475
    Dave Whiteside
    Participant

    Hi Marc,
    Some impressive racing history there. I’m almost into my 10 year anniversary and at the age of 60 will probably hit around 2,500 miles for the year this year having already completed a sub 20 hour 100 miler in January. If you take your time, listen to your body, continue to cross train (I do a fun triathlon almost every Sunday) and do some strength training, anything is possible. It’s as much a mind game as it is a physical game, but you already know that. Take it easy for now, and it will come back. Good luck.
    Dave.

    in reply to: First Ever HipRunner Group Run – Please Join Us! #18452
    Dave Whiteside
    Participant

    I’m in! Let’s go team “The Hip Runners”

    in reply to: 5 Months Post Operation #18394
    Dave Whiteside
    Participant

    As Tom said, take your time and listen to your body, strengthen your hips. I started off running 5K’s and 10K’s and now run ultra’s about every 5 weeks. If you want it, you can get it, just run slow, and then slow down some more until you find your legs and then let them take you on a magical journey.

    in reply to: Shoes #18387
    Dave Whiteside
    Participant

    Hi Buzz,
    I prefer more of a minimal/normal shoe. I’ve tried Hoka’s and other shoes with a large cushion and I didn’t like them. I would develop hot spots on my feet and would feel like I was rolling in them. I run races up to 100 miles and do perfectly well on them. I’ve ran in On Running, Altra’s, Newtons and other. I also prefer something like a 4mm drop on my shoes, and nothing heavier than 9 ounces. I think some of it depends on your gait, how far ahead your feet land rather than under you head and cadence. I try to keep a 174+ cadence on slow runs up to 190+ on short distance races. I also run 4 miles barefoot on the beach with no issue. Strength, flexibility type training I think also helps. I would try what you used to run in and only change if they are not working for you. A lot of companies, especially local stores, have a 30 day guarantee where you can take them back and exchange them if they don’t work. Hope that works. This weekend I’m running 60 miles of bridge repeats for my 60th birthday.
    Dave.

    in reply to: Michigan Runners with Hip Replacements #18259
    Dave Whiteside
    Participant

    Hi Stuart, sorry I’m late to the party. I also was a long time soccer player and never did real running before my hip replacement in December 2010. The first couple of years it was just for fun, trying to lose some of the weight of doing nothing for 5 years because of my hip. After that I caught the bug and and started racing 5K’s and quickly up to a marathon. I didn’t listen to my body and pushed to hard and had two 1 year injuries, no damage to my hip, just soreness around the area that transferred down my leg. Now I do more strength training, don’t do as much fast running, and do lots of slower long distance running. I now mainly run ultras and do very well at it, running 60 miles for my 60th birthday in 2 weeks. Good luck with your journey. Dave.

    in reply to: Stress Response #18258
    Dave Whiteside
    Participant

    I find that any faster workouts aggravate my hip so typically I don’t do many. However long slow distance running is great and I never feel any issues with my hip. Strengthening and flexibility training will also help as you need to build up your muscles. Anything is possible, just don’t push it too hard when your body tells you to back off.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 190 total)