Pietro

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 16 total)
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  • in reply to: THR = Running – Surgeons Response #20084
    Pietro
    Participant

    Hi Pete, no, not stepping on any toes, all cool. Of course as neurologist I have no expertise whatsoever in joints and ortho surgery, but I have at least some familiarity with weighing up evidence from the scientific literature, and I have a few chats with orthopaedic surgeons – though they are not the ones who encourage me to run!

    in reply to: THR = Running – Surgeons Response #20032
    Pietro
    Participant

    Whilst most surgeons are reluctant to approve of running as they are concerned about being blamed for acute hardware failure, if you ask them what is the most frequent cause leading to revision surgery they will admit that it is not injuries/acute trauma/sudden failure. Rather, it is recurrent pain/progression of arthritis/degeneration of the biological interface. In the absence of large studies (a few small studies suggest that running does not result in worse outcomes of THJR at least after 5 years or longer) the next best available evidence (from larger studies) is that running does not accelerate arthritis (in fact there is a good chance it may stave it off). Biologically, mobilisation and weight bearing results in stronger bone structure/density, so to me it make sense to run. Additionally, one needs to put on the scale the long term cardiovascular benefits of running as aerobic, weight-loss exercise. I have been running more than 4,000 km on my artificial hips now, and 3 years after surgery my mobility, strength and running times are still improving (parkrun in 21:45 today, age grade 70.02%).

    in reply to: 9 months post surgery #19742
    Pietro
    Participant

    Hi Pete
    Wow, to get a 75% age grade I would probably need to get an under 20 min Parkrun. Who knows, I am still improving.
    Sciatica can be a bummer, but luckily some cases can improve without surgery. Good to know Parkrun. Is back in Old Blighty!

    Pietro
    Participant

    hi Stuart, yep, had right and left THJR 4 months apart, 2 years ago. About 3 months after the first one I did only a bit of shy jog/walks. After the second one, again I left it 3 months before jogging/walking intervals. Good days and bad days, particularly at the beginning. Being sensible but keeping positive was the best approach. Also, you lose a lot of nerves and muscles with the surgery so I found swimmming pool walking/squatting first, then gym sessions (lunges, squats, stretching) helped a lot. I only go to the gym once a week now, but did it 2-3 times/week in the first few months. Two years after, I have already one marathon and several half marathons under the belt, and my pace is slowly approaching my pre-surgery PBs.

    • This reply was modified 9 months, 3 weeks ago by Pietro.
    in reply to: 9 months post surgery #19722
    Pietro
    Participant

    hi everyone

    haven’t posted in a while but here’s an update. I managed to train well, and ran the Rotorua Marathon in May 2021 just under 4:20. That’s 30-35 minutes slower than the last 2 pre-surgery marathons, but a finish is what I had prepared for, and got it comfortably. I am still training (run 2 times/week, gym once a week focussing on squats/lunges/deadlifts), and my times are improving. My parkrun time yesterday was 22:12 and I still felt a bit in the tank. That’s a 68.09% age grade, another 2% and I will be matching my pre-surgery PB. The hips are fine when I run, and it is now 2 years since surgery. Recent x-ray shows a very good state of implants. I get a groin spasm on the right when flexing the hip/doing abdo crunches, but not when I run, and it’s been pretty much like that all the time so I am not worried about it.

    Will post update every now and then!

    in reply to: 9 months post surgery #18960
    Pietro
    Participant

    hi everyone, good update. I kept the running going, at least 3 times/week. Just 2 weeks ago I finished my first post-surgery half marathon, exactly one year after my most recent surgery. The hips were stiff during the race, but not a big issue. I think it is more about rebuilding fitness and regaining muscles than any hardware problems.
    I had trained just to finish a comfortable sub-2hours half marathon (in fact from my training time I was expecting a 1:55). Little I knew that after 3 km the road ended and the rest of the race was an off-road steep and treacherous adventure race, without a single level section. I put a wrong foot a couple of times, and had to worry more about getting home without breaking my new hips than getting a decent time. Jogged very slow the last 3 km to a grumpy 2:11 finish, but hey. I have recovered and I am running nicely now, not really training hard (no races anytime soon). Ticking along 23:40 at parkrun, without killing myself. I find that going to the gym once or twice doing lunges, stretching, foam rollers and putting weights on the squatting rack helps quite a bit.
    I will jog a leisurely half marathon alongside the missus next month, and from January I will get the miles up – a full marathon in May 2021 is the target.

    in reply to: 2 weeks post-op #18797
    Pietro
    Participant

    I agree Odie, running should be a lifetime enjoyment, or nearly, and being in a hurry doesn’t help. Interesting the horse riding thing. I think the old advice given by many OS “cycling, no impact on hip – good, running, high impact – bad” is not reality base. Even the most tame cyclists, like me (I did a few timid short triathlons, but mostly I cycled to work) will fall and land heavily on their hips every now and then. Surely that is more risky than the hypothetical wear from running…

    in reply to: 3 months post-op, 1st jog #18796
    Pietro
    Participant

    Hi Richard
    I find my sorest areas are like yours under my scars at the great trochanter. I am still weak with the abductors on the left. Every time in the gym I lie down on one side and lift the extended leg up in the air, locking the knee. The left is still sore and weaker.
    Some runs are followed by soreness, and some aren’t. Pretty random really. The best is to take time and rest between runs and restart when things are comfortable. It’s snakes and ladders really, 2 step forwards, one step back.

    in reply to: 9 months post surgery #18795
    Pietro
    Participant

    Thanks Pete and Tom
    Well, in the last 2 Parkruns I finished in 23:42 and 23:43. A sea away from my PB of 20:50 but still improving! Distance becoming comfortable too. We are lucky here as there are no recorded covid19 cases in NZ except for quarantined people flying in from overseas. So all running events are on. I am running comfortably 16km in my weekend run, and I have entered my first post-op half Marathon, Rotorua in 2 months from now. If it goes well I will be back to the full marathon in May 2021.

    in reply to: 5 months post surgery #17889
    Pietro
    Participant

    Hi Pete, I think you can be very happy with your age grade…
    I actually started running after the onset of hip arthritis as I could no longer do sports involving contact/jumping/twisting. Was still doing ok up to 2 years ago with a parkrun best of 20:50 and a marathon around 3:45 every year, so I still have a bit of recpbuilding to do before I get there, but it’s looking good.
    I particularly appreciate the posts of those like you who are still running a few years after surgery, as there isn’t any decent amount of published data about running in the long term.

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 2 months ago by Pietro.
    in reply to: 4 months post-surgery #17688
    Pietro
    Participant

    Thanks Tom, it’s going well indeed. Two weeks after the injuries are much better, and here I am just back from a parkrun. Finished in 27:08, improving the pace by 30”/km from last week. I was so happy with the progress I just coasted the last 800m to keep the incentive of an easy new goal for next week 😄. The hips are not an issue at all, in fact today it felt like proper running for the first time. I could relax stretching my stride better than I could before surgery. I am taking care to focus on forefoot landing though. Current items to work on are residual abductors weakness (definitely improving), looking after calf injuries, and regain lost fitness… but man does it feel good!

    in reply to: 3 months post-op, 1st jog #17553
    Pietro
    Participant

    Well done Curryn. I suspect your DIY schedule is much better for you than any one-size-fit-all program. I am finding out that my new hip joints are not really an issue, rather I need to adapt depending on how other parts of the body respond to running. My left calf and right knee in particular seem to suffer from a mild residual limp from left hip adductors weakness (the one replaced most recently, almost 4 months ago). But it is all improving, and I am getting there. The balance between patience and perseverance is everything.

    in reply to: 3 months post-op, 1st jog #17382
    Pietro
    Participant

    Well done and good luck to you too Nancy. I live in a perfect place for all year round running, never icy, never too hot. I think you do well to take care of avoiding traumatic injuries, as that is far more dangerous than any issues from repetitive efforts. It is interesting to see how different OSs have different -in fact opposing- views about how to best preserve your hip joints, and how little data is there to back up such opinions. As I work in the field, though I am not a surgeon, I have regular conversations with OSs. Just the other day I had 3 of them in front of me. Their views? Ranged from “no restrictions” to “you shouldn’t run at all”.
    Also, if you look at scientific publications, I think the “consensus” published by OSs is disconcerting. Hypothetically, many OSs deem activities like cycling, tennis, and downhill skiing (!) as preferable to running. But they fail to comment on – in fact they seem to have no idea of real life risks of breaking your femur from falls from a bike, or twisting legs while skiing.
    Again – consensus taken by “opinions” at meetings, no data to back up. I know where I stand… running is probably better than all that.

    in reply to: 2 months post-op #15477
    Pietro
    Participant

    thank you Tom. Still progressing well: I have just walked the parkrun 5km in 35:31 this morning, and no spasms afterwards (any faster than that and I might have to run it!). I am going through the hoops: elliptical trainer, stationary bike, wall climbing machine, brisk walks, stretching… and I have even been quietly started fitting in a few slow jogs in my walks. Started with 30 seconds very slow jog and 90 seconds walk only 2 or 3 times, and now I can comfortably alternate 1 min jog and 1 min walk for 10 reps. This is just to keep moving a bit, as my second hip is coming in less than 3 weeks now. The real test will come in about 4 or 5 months. But it feels awesome to be outdoors and to start “running”, even at a ridiculously slow pace. It keeps your mind on the right track.

    in reply to: 6 weeks post-op #15379
    Pietro
    Participant

    Well, now 7 weeks post-op. Still limping, and still sore at times, but still hoping to improve much more than this. Today I went to the local parkrun. Took the cane with me just in case, but did not use it at all. Walked the 5 km just under 50 minutes. Hip a bit sorer for the following hour, but I have recovered already. I plan to ask the OS to set a date for the other hip soon, as the operated one is now strong enough to support weight and take care of most of the walking/getting out of bed.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 16 total)